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Interview

Style and Technique


Anasazi Dwelling, Colorado Plateau
PDN
How did your own photography evolve as far as style, subject matter and technique?

JOHN SEXTON
I make photographs and still make photographs of the natural environment. It's a love because that was part of my life before I was involved in photography. The highlight of my year as a youngster was the two weeks we spent every year in Yosemite and the Sierra Nevada camping and hiking and exploring as a family vacation. So when I became interested in photography and further being inspired by the work that I saw of Ansel and others, it was a natural extension to go back to these places that I knew as a kid and explore them with my camera. But a few years ago, extending the reach of the subject matter from what we sometimes refer to as "Rocks & Roots" Photography, I began to explore in the Southwest ancient Anasazi sites that had been abandoned. And it seemed like a logical extension because they are situated in such a spectacular landscape of the Southwestern Canyon country.

PDN
Tell us about how photographing the man–made landscape came about?

JOHN SEXTON
One of the workshop participants had shown me a single 8 X 10 photograph of a power plant where he actually was the general manager of this power cooperative. It was quite magical to me. I remembered seeing it and it was this metallic turbine and I thought it was beautiful. I had never been in a power plant before, but I felt, without being overly dramatic, compelled to make photographs of this for myself.



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